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LATEST VITAMIN D NEWS
 
UPCOMING EVENTS, BLOG AND NEW BOOKS
Transcriptome differences in prostate cancer highlight racial disparities and vitamin D
Jul 26, 2016

The results of clinical studies by investigators at the Medical University of South Carolina (MUSC) and the Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center (VAMC), reported in the July 2016 issue of Pharmacogenomics, demonstrate transcriptome-level linkages between racial disparities in circulating levels of vitamin D and expression of pro-inflammatory genes in African American (AA) patients with prostate cancer compared to European American (EA) patients.

Racial disparities in prostate cancer are well documented with AA men having significantly higher risk of developing prostate cancer and significantly higher mortality rates than EA men. In addition, among patients presenting at the same disease stage, AA men often have higher prostate-specific antigen (PSA) levels and higher-grade tumors than EA men. However, the biological mechanisms underlying these substantial and persistent disparities are unclear

full story . . .
On vitamin D, sun-starved Brits should look to Norway
Jul 21, 2016

Is anyone surprised that we Brits are in danger of having vitamin D deficiencies? Those long winter nights might be far from your mind right now, but seeing how keen we are to strip off as soon as the sun comes out might remind us that sunshine, an important source of vitamin D, isn’t that common a sight. A report from Public Health England has today recommended that everyone should take vitamin D supplements (before it was only under-fives and those ‘at risk’ who were recommended to do so). The suggested daily amount is 10 micrograms and, when the sun goes into hiding, it’s difficult to achieve that through food alone.

full story . . .
Teeth from as far back as 1200s show signs of vitamin D deficiency: McMaster
Jul 20, 2016

Teeth from four French women and two Quebec residents who died hundreds of years ago show the telltale signs of vitamin D deficiency, a new study says.

Teeth from four French women and two Quebec residents who died hundreds of years ago show the telltale signs of vitamin D deficiency, a new study says.

Lori D'Ortenzio, a PhD candidate in anthropology at McMaster University in Hamilton, came up with the idea to use teeth to detect vitamin D deficiency though people in her field usually deal with bones.

Unlike bones, teeth store a permanent record of microscopic abnormalities in layers of dentin, beneath the enamel, akin to the rings of a tree that begin to develop before birth, said D'Ortenzio, who led the study.

Researchers analyzed a total of 12 teeth from four women who were buried in a French cemetery between 1225 and 1798 and two people who were buried in rural Quebec between 1771 and 1860, a child believed to be three years old and a 24-year-old man.

An examination of three of the man's teeth showed he'd suffered four bouts of rickets before he turned 13, D'Ortenzio said.

full story . . .
Summer is the season to boost vitamin D levels
Jul 14, 2016

With school out and vacations in full swing, Canadians will be spending more time outdoors soaking up the sun.

 
According to the Vitamin D Society, summer is the best time for Canadians to naturally generate vitamin D, which has many positive effects, including reducing the risk of developing serious diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, osteoporosis and others.
 
Dr. Reinhold Vieth, Scientific Advisor for the Vitamin D Society and professor at the University of Toronto, says that in addition to generating vitamin D, sunlight is known to improve mood and wellbeing. However, because of Canada’s northern latitude, our timeframe for getting the most from the sun’s rays is short – from May to October.
 
“Right now, we are in vitamin D summer. When the UV index is above 3 and your shadow is shorter than your height is when you can make vitamin D.” says Dr. Vieth. “For years, many strands of research have shown that people who are active in sunshine are healthier than those who avoid sun. We often assume that the health benefits of sunshine are solely due to vitamin D, but that is not proven yet.  In other words, it is likely that sunshine does more for our bodies than just produce vitamin D.”
full story . . .
Vitamin D deficiency could increase risk of diabetes related coronary heart disease
Jul 05, 2016

Researchers from Creighton University School of Medicine have linked vitamin D deficiency with the development and progression of coronary heart disease (CAD), a common serious diabetes complication.

The study, conducted in collaboration with the American Heart Association and published in the Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis and Vascular Biology journal, looked at the role of vitamin D in CAD through markers of chronic inflammation in epicardial adipose tissue (EAT).

A previous study already found that the inflammatory effects of vitamin D deficiency is associated with an increased prevalence of diabetic retinopathy in young people with type 1 diabetes.
 

full story . . .
Sun safety important Ė but donít ignore health benefits of sun exposure
Jun 30, 2016

It’s virtually a given, as it has been for decades, that protecting ourselves from the sun is an essential part of staying healthy through the warmer months. We’ve known for years about the dangers we face in failing to practice proper sun safety, namely an increased risk of skin cancer and melanoma, not to mention permanent skin damage and premature wrinkling.

Most of us understand the need to apply sunscreen and be mindful of the amount of time we spend outside. But what if there’s something we’ve been missing? According to family physician Dr. Gerry Schwalfenberg, our conventional wisdom may have shifted so far in the direction of sun avoidance that we’re actually neglecting to acknowledge an important fact: our bodies need sunlight to produce vitamin D, which is essential to our overall health.

“If you cover up, avoid UV and don’t get some sun exposure at midday in summer, chances are that you are going to be vitamin D deficient,” says Dr. Schwalfenberg.

full story . . .
 
Events  
20th Vitamin D Workshop
Mar 01, 2017        

20th Vitamin D Workshop

2017
 

Date to be annouced soon!

event details
Blog  
Putting the Risk of Vitamin D Toxicity into Perspective
Mar 31, 2016

by Samantha Kimball, PhD, MLT

Vitamin D is unique among nutrients. Vitamin D is actually more of a hormone than a vitamin. Vitamin D is used by nearly every cell in the body. It can be obtained naturally from the sun or by ingesting it. It was named a “vitamin” when it was discovered that many people were deficient and it could be obtained from their diet, this happened because they were not getting enough from sun exposure. This is more prevalent today than ever.

If you are lucky enough to live near the equator, where you can synthesize vitamin D year-round, and you spend a minimal amount of time unprotected in the sun and fully exposed (15 minutes in a bathing suit) each day, you probably get enough vitamin D from that ball of life in the sky. However, we Canadians are not so lucky. Our northern climate means that in the winter the sun isn’t powerful enough for our bodies to make vitamin D at all and in the summer months, when it is possible to make vitamin D, most people wear sunscreen which blocks the sun and the production of vitamin D. With our extremely limited ability to obtain vitamin D naturally we need to supplement.

There is a continuous debate among vitamin D experts about how much vitamin D you need to take to be healthy. Opinions and comments like “Vitamin D has health benefits,” but “you shouldn’t take too much because it is just too risky!” are confusing and often portrayed in parallel in the media. What is missing is a little perspective.

full post . . .
How much vitamin D should I take?
Jan 14, 2016

This is the most common question for vitamin D. Recommending, calculating or finding the right dose of vitamin D intake for anyone is difficult. That’s because it’s complicated!

Why? Because everyone is different. Different weights, genetics, skin colour, diets, UV exposure etc. What research has shown us is that the same D3 supplementation dose given to a group of people will result in a wide range of vitamin D blood levels as determined through 25(OH)D testing.

Here is a chart published by GrassrootsHealth which shows vitamin D levels by D3 supplementation dose taken. You can see that the same dose provides a huge variation in vitamin D blood levels. How can anyone really predict where you will fall in this chart?

Recently a new Canadian research paper1 was published in the peer reviewed journal Nutrients, by a group of researchers from the University of Alberta (Veuglers 2015). They used a dual approach and a review of 108 published estimates of vitamin D supplementation to determine the optimal vitamin D dose that minimizes the risk for both a low and high vitamin D blood level.

full post . . .
The vitamin D debate is not likely to disappear
Dec 04, 2015

by Samantha Kimball, PhD, MLT

 There seems to be a line drawn in the sand with respect to the debate concerning what the optimal levels of vitamin D are for health, and neither side wants to budge. On one side of the line of the current debate are those who support the recommendations officially set by government agencies.  However, most of the researchers who actively study vitamin D consider the latest official advice to be inadequate.  

There has been contention about the vitamin D recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine (IOM, which advises both Health Canada and the United States Food and Drug Administration).  The IOM released its updated report for vitamin D and calcium in 2010. Yet several groups of vitamin D experts suggest that people should achieve ‘optimal’ levels of vitamin D status, levels that are considerably higher than the ones the IOM recommendations are based on. The IOM’s Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) of 600 IU/d was calculated to achieve adequate vitamin D status which was determined to be serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels [25(OH)D] of 50 nmol/L in 97.5% of the population. On the other hand, the Endocrine Society, Osteoporosis Canada, American Geriatrics society and the European Vitamin D Association all recommend target 25(OH)D levels of at least 75 nmol/L. The Vitamin D Society, Grassroots Health and the Vitamin D Council recommend that 25(OH)D levels be maintained above 100 nmol/L which require intakes well above the RDA and even above the tolerable upper level of intake (UL) in overweight and obese individuals. Why would the subject matter experts disagree with the IOM so openly?

full post . . .
Books  

Susan Rex Ryan
Defend Your Life

Defend Your Life has three main sections. The first addresses the fundamentals of vitamin D3 and its awesome benefits as well as minimal risk. The second highlights select diseases and conditions about which vitamin D3 may offer protection. The third includes the author's personal vitamin D3 story, including her theory about adequate vitamin D3 levels and how you can 'Defend Your Life'.

Reading this book will help you understand how adequate amounts of vitamin D3 are essential to enhancing your quality of life.


Ian Wishart
Vitamin D: Is This the Miracle Vitamin?

In this compelling new book,award-winning investigative journalist and bestselling author Ian Wishart brings together the most up to date science on vitamin D and how it could well save your life. Cancer? Up to a 77% reduction in risk of developing it if you take this vitamin. Heart disease? The same kind of reduction. Did you know that autism, mental illness and multiple sclerosis all appear to be caused by a lack of vitamin D during pregnancy?

The lives of every single person, including you, will be affected by the information in this book. With more than 300 scientific trials and studies cited, this book is a reference guide not just for the general reader but for medical professionals alike.


John J. Cannell, MD
Athlete's Edge - Faster, Quicker, Stronger with vitamin D

John Cannell, founder and executive director of the Vitamin D Council, provides a new perspective on the vitamin D story revealing a long-held secret once known only to Eastern European athletic trainers.

Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, improves muscle tone, muscle strength, balance, reaction time and physical endurance, as well as immunity and general health. In addition, ideal levels of vitamin D help protect you from a staggering array of chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, asthma, autism and even influenza.


 more books...

PRESS RELEASES
 
SCIENTIFIC ADVISORS

Summer is the season for Canadians to naturally boost vitamin D levels

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

TORONTO, Ont (July 14, 2016) – With school out and vacations in full swing, Canadians will be spending more time outdoors soaking up the sun.

According to the Vitamin D Society, summer is the best time for Canadians to naturally generate vitamin D, which has many positive effects, including reducing the risk of developing serious diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, osteoporosis and others.

Dr. Reinhold Vieth, Scientific Advisor for the Vitamin D Society and professor at the University of Toronto, says that in addition to generating vitamin D, sunlight is known to improve mood and wellbeing. However, because of Canada’s northern latitude, our timeframe for getting the most from the sun’s rays is short – from May to October.

“Right now, we are in vitamin D summer. When the UV index is above 3 and your shadow is shorter than your height is when you can make vitamin D.” says Dr. Vieth. “For years, many strands of research have shown that people who are active in sunshine are healthier than those who avoid sun. We often assume that the health benefits of sunshine are solely due to vitamin D, but that is not proven yet.  In other words, it is likely that sunshine does more for our bodies than just produce vitamin D.”

full press release

New study questions sun avoidance in northern latitude countries like Canada

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

TORONTO. Ont. (May 25, 2016) – With summer just around the corner, a new study out of the Netherlands has questioned if sun-avoidance advice actually benefits a person’s general health.

In the study “Sunlight: For Better or For Worse? A Review of Positive and Negative Effects of Sun Exposure,” Dr. Han van der Rhee and his team reviewed 115 studies and found that there is no unequivocal scientific proof that eliminating time spent in the sun has a beneficial effect on the human body.

The researchers found that the present ‘epidemic’ of skin cancer is mainly caused by the increase of intermittent sun exposure, coinciding with the decrease of chronic exposure. Meaning that most people are just not outside in the sun on a regular daily basis. The researchers claim that it’s unlikely that continuous protection during daily life contributes to our health, particularly in countries with a temperate climate, and warns that both too much and too little sunlight may be harmful to our health.

full press release

MAY IS NATIONAL SUNSHINE MONTH

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

Research shows increases in sun exposure correlates with positive health outcomes

TORONTO. Ont. (May 6, 2016) – In an effort to increase public awareness of the importance of sunshine to human health, the Vitamin D Society today announced its support of a new GrassrootsHealth-led public health initiative, declaring May as “National Sunshine Month.”

According to GrassrootsHealth, with the transition from an agrarian to a technology-driven society, and other shifts in cultural behavior over the past several decades, people spend more time indoors than at any time in human history. The resulting decrease in exposure to sunlight is inhibiting our ability to fight many life-threatening diseases, including diabetes, colon cancer, breast cancer and, ironically, even skin cancer.

“Missing sunlight puts us at serious risk of a multitude of dangerous health problems,” says Carole Baggerly, Director of GrassrootsHealth. “It is essential that we improve public understanding of the need for sunshine exposure and health outcomes.”

Over the next four weeks, GrassrootsHealth’s experts in the medical and scientific communities will educate the public and those in the medical and healthcare fields on why the sun is essential for public health. This will include the launch of GrassrootsHealth’s newest program, “Harness the Power of the Sun for Health,” which will provide software for individuals to assess their current situation, set sunshine goals and track vitamin D levels and health outcomes.

 

full press release
 
Dr. Reinhold Vieth

Professor, University of Toronto, Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology.


Click to View Carole Baggerly

"Director, GrassrootsHealth, a Public Health Promotion Organization
leading D*action, the world's largest ongoing vitamin D intervention
project.
www.grassrootshealth.net"

 


Click to View Dr. John Cannell M.D.

Executive Director‚ The Vitamin D Council
San Luis Obispo, CA, USA

www.vitamindcouncil.com


 more advisors...

Converter Tool

In Canada Vitamin D 25(OH)D levels are measured in nmol/L. In the U.S. it is measured as ng/ml. To convert:

Enter nmol/L: ng/ml
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