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LATEST VITAMIN D NEWS
 
UPCOMING EVENTS AND NEW BOOKS
Secret to health benefits of sunshine is more than vitamin D
Feb 26, 2015

Summer sunshine makes most of us feel better, but there may be more to the benefits than just feeling good. A growing body of evidence suggests sunlight itself – with adequate protection, of course – may actually be good for health.

Sunlight comprises two types of : UVA, which causes reddening and burning of the skin, and UVB. The latter increases the production of an inactive form or precursor of vitamin D by the skin, which is then activated by the liver and kidneys.

Unfortunately, both UVA and UVB also increase the risk of , including the most deadly type, melanoma, which is why you should always take a balanced approach to exposure.

full story . . .
Omega-3 Fatty Acids and Vitamin D May Control Brain Serotonin, Affecting Behavior and Psychiatric Disorders
Feb 26, 2015

Newswise — Oakland, CA (February 25, 2015) - Although essential marine omega-3 fatty acids and vitamin D have been shown to improve cognitive function and behavior in the context of certain brain disorders, the underlying mechanism has been unclear. In a new paper published in FASEB Journal* by Rhonda Patrick, PhD and Bruce Ames, PhD of Children’s Hospital Oakland Research Institute (CHORI), serotonin is explained as the possible missing link tying together why vitamin D and marine omega-3 fatty acids might ameliorate the symptoms associated with a broad array of brain disorders.

full story . . .
Vitamin D Levels Linked to Type 2 Diabetes Risk
Feb 25, 2015

Association was found even when people weren't overweight, researchers said

WebMD News from HealthDay By Robert Preidt, HealthDay Reporter

MONDAY, Feb. 23, 2015 (HealthDay News) -- People with low levels of vitamin D appear to have an increased risk for type 2 diabetes, even if they aren't overweight or obese, a new study suggests.

The study included almost 150 people in Spain. Their vitamin D levels were checked, as was their body mass index (BMI -- an estimate of body fat based on height and weight). They also had tests for diabetes, prediabetes or other blood sugar (glucose) metabolism disorders.

Obese people who didn't have diabetes or related disorders had higher vitamin D levels than those with diabetes. Lean people with diabetes or related disorders were more likely to have low vitamin D levels than those without such disorders.

full story . . .
Sunlight Holds Key To Killing Breast Cancer
Feb 10, 2015

A new study finds vitamin D -- the 'sunlight vitamin' -- strikes to the very heart of breast cancer malignancy.

Breast cancer is not what most people think. Beneath the intimidating statistics that make it seem like a juggernaut of inevitability or a time bomb of genetic determinism ready to go off in the asymptomatic breasts of millions of women, a far more complex conversation is occurring among clinicians and researchers concerning the true nature and causes of cancer, and why conventional therapies fail to turn the tide against the second highest cause of death in the Western world.  To fully appreciate this, one must go to the first hand research itself.

For instance, a new study published in The Journal of Steroid Biochemistry and Molecular Biology identifies an overlooked root cause of breast cancer (cancer stem cells), as well as a natural intervention that has yet to be incorporated into the conventional standard of cancer care.

full story . . .
Low Childhood Vitamin D Linked to Adult Atherosclerosis
Feb 10, 2015

Newswise — Washington, DC—Low levels of 25-OH vitamin D in childhood were associated with subclinical atherosclerosis over 25 years later in adulthood, according to a new study published in the Endocrine Society’s Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism.

The importance of vitamin D for cardiovascular health has been the focus of increasing interest. Low levels of vitamin D have previously been shown to be related to increased risk of stroke and heart attack. Vitamin D deficiency and insufficiency are highly prevalent among children worldwide, and this study examined the relationship between low childhood vitamin D levels and adult increased carotid intima-thickness (IMT). IMT is a marker of structural atherosclerosis, which correlates with cardiovascular risk factors, and predicts cardiovascular events.

full story . . .
Sunlight and vitamin D levels higher for coastal populations
Feb 09, 2015

 

Summary:
People living close to the coast in England have higher vitamin D levels than inland dwellers. Exposure to sunlight is a crucial factor in vitamin D production and the research has also found that English coasts tend to see a greater amount of sunlight across the year when compared with inland areas. The study is the first time that data on sunlight and vitamin D levels have been linked to detailed geographical information.

 

full story . . .
 
Events  
Vitamin D for Public Health
Dec 09, 2014        8:00 am

Integrating Sunshine, Supplements and Measurement for Optimal Health

This seminar, presented by UC San Diego School of Medicine and GrassrootsHealth, has been developed as an educational opportunity to present and discuss the science of vitamin D and sunshine. The objective of the meeting is to leave with an implementation plan for your group – using vitamin D and sunshine to optimize health.

We’re looking forward to seeing you there!

Cedric F. Garland, Dr. P.H.                                          Carole Baggerly
University of California, San Diego                             Director, GrassrootsHealth

event details
18th Vitamin D Workshop April 21-24, 2015
Apr 21, 2015        8:00 am

On behalf of the Workshop Executive Committee, you are

cordially invited to attend the 18th Vitamin D Workshop in

Delft, the Netherlands, April 21-24, 2015. The Vitamin D

Workshop features overviews and original reports on basic,

epidemiological and clinical research, oral as well as poster

sessions.

event details
Books  

Susan Rex Ryan
Defend Your Life

Defend Your Life has three main sections. The first addresses the fundamentals of vitamin D3 and its awesome benefits as well as minimal risk. The second highlights select diseases and conditions about which vitamin D3 may offer protection. The third includes the author's personal vitamin D3 story, including her theory about adequate vitamin D3 levels and how you can 'Defend Your Life'.

Reading this book will help you understand how adequate amounts of vitamin D3 are essential to enhancing your quality of life.


Ian Wishart
Vitamin D: Is This the Miracle Vitamin?

In this compelling new book,award-winning investigative journalist and bestselling author Ian Wishart brings together the most up to date science on vitamin D and how it could well save your life. Cancer? Up to a 77% reduction in risk of developing it if you take this vitamin. Heart disease? The same kind of reduction. Did you know that autism, mental illness and multiple sclerosis all appear to be caused by a lack of vitamin D during pregnancy?

The lives of every single person, including you, will be affected by the information in this book. With more than 300 scientific trials and studies cited, this book is a reference guide not just for the general reader but for medical professionals alike.


 more books...

PRESS RELEASES
 
SCIENTIFIC ADVISORS

Building consensus on optimal vitamin D levels in Canada

Key disease organizations support effort to curb vitamin D deficiency

TORONTO, Ont. (November 21, 2014) - A push to develop a Canadian Vitamin D Consesus that can be used to educate Canadians on the importance of optimal vitamin D levels for health is gaining support.

Vitamin D experts from around the world attended a workshop in Toronto earlier this month with the goal of reducing vitamin D deficiency in Canada.

A number of prominent Canadian disease organizations, including the Multiple Sclerosis Society of Canada, Osteoporosis Canada, the Canadan Breast Cancer Foundation and Prostate Cancer Canada attended the November 4 workshop on vitamin D.

"It's extemely encouraging to see momentum building behind efforts to improve education among Canadians on how to ensure they are getting enough vitamin D. Together, we can help people improve their health and reduce risk to several serious diseases," said workshop chairperson Dr. Reinhold Vieth, retired director of the Bone and Mineral Laboratory at Mount Sinai Hospital and a professor at the University of Toronto in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiolgy.

 

full press release

Shining a light on need to boost vitamin D levels in Canada

Vitamin D Society workshop on Nov. 4 to build consensus on curbing vitamin D deficiency

TORONTO, Ont. (October 31, 2014) – As winter draws closer and our daylight hours grow shorter, Canadians are being urged to take steps to protect their health by maintaining sufficient levels of vitamin D.

To mark Vitamin D Awareness Month in November, The Vitamin D Society is spreading the word about the importance of proper vitamin D levels and the affect it has on our everyday health.

On Tuesday, November 4 in Toronto the non-profit organization is hosting the Vitamin D Consensus Workshop, featuring several international medical experts. Representatives from key disease organizations have been invited to attend to help develop a Canadian Vitamin D Consensus that can be used to educate Canadians on the importance of optimal vitamin D levels for health. The workshop comes shortly after World Vitamin D Day on November 2.

“Due to Canada’s northern latitude, Canadians cannot get sufficient levels of vitamin D through sunshine from November to May,” said workshop presenter Dr. Reinhold Vieth, retired director of the Bone and Mineral Laboratory at Mount Sinai Hospital and a professor at the University of Toronto in the Department of Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology. “Low levels of vitamin D can create a higher risk of serious diseases, such as cancer, cardiovascular disease, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, osteoporosis and others.”

full press release

Higher Vitamin D Does Not Raise the Risk for Kidney Stones

The Vitamin D Society wants to make the public aware of a recent study which reported that high levels of vitamin D had a lower risk of kidney stones.

Woodstock, ON (PRWEB) November 29, 2013

The Vitamin D Society wants to make the public aware of a recent study published in the American Journal of Public Health, which reported that study participants with the highest vitamin D blood serum levels actually had a lower incidence of kidney stones(1). These results show that higher vitamin D intake cannot be a substantial cause of kidney stones because as participants vitamin D levels increased, kidney stone cases actually decreased. The study was sponsored by GrassrootsHealth (GRH), a nonprofit public health research organization, and was led by Dr. Cedric Garland, professor of family and preventive medicine at the University of California San Diego. The research team used data collected from 2,012 participants enrolled in GrassrootsHealth’s D*action study. This study is the first of its kind to include participants with a wide range of 25(OH)D blood serum levels, especially on the higher end of the spectrum between 100 nmol/L and 250 nmol/L, and is therefore a more rigorous test of the suggested association with kidney stones than previous studies.

full press release
 
Dr. Reinhold Vieth

Clinical Biochemist at Mount Sinai Hospital and Professor - University of Toronto, Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology.


Click to View Carole Baggerly

"Director, GrassrootsHealth, a Public Health Promotion Organization
leading D*action, the world's largest ongoing vitamin D intervention
project.
www.grassrootshealth.net"

 


Click to View Dr. John Cannell M.D.

Executive Director‚ The Vitamin D Council
San Luis Obispo, CA, USA

www.vitamindcouncil.com


 more advisors...

Converter Tool

In Canada Vitamin D 25(OH)D levels are measured in nmol/L. In the U.S. it is measured as ng/ml. To convert:

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