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UPCOMING EVENTS, BLOG AND NEW BOOKS
Sun is good for you you may live longer, study finds
Apr 28, 2016

Vitamin D Society urges re-examination of sun safety guidelines

Toronto – Swedish women who avoid sunshine shorten their lifespans by the same amount as smoking. This latest research was just published in the Journal of Internal Medicine. Like the Swedes, Canadians need to balance the benefits of sun exposure with the risks. It is not healthy to avoid sunshine, which provides the ultraviolet light that makes vitamin D, says the Vitamin D Society.

Between 1990 and 1992, 30,000 Swedish women were surveyed about risk factors for malignant melanoma the worst form of skin cancer. For the next 20 years, the women’s death records were followed. Those women with active sun exposure habits were at a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease and causes of death other than cancer or heart disease, causes such as diabetes, multiple sclerosis and pulmonary disease.

Compared to those with the highest sun exposure, life expectancy for women who avoided sun was shorter by .6 to 2.1 years.
 

full story . . .
Vitamin D insufficiency, low rate of DNA methylation in black teens may increase disease risk
Apr 25, 2016

Low levels of vitamin D in black teens correlates with low activity of a major mechanism for controlling gene expression that may increase their risk of cancer and other disease, researchers report.

Their study measured D levels as well as levels of global DNA methylation in 454 healthy individuals age 14-18. In this group, 99 percent of the white teens had adequate vitamin D levels, 66 percent of the black teens were vitamin D-deficient and all the black teens had lower levels of methylation compared to their white peers, said Dr. Haidong Zhu, molecular geneticist at the Georgia Prevention Institute at the Medical College of Georgia at Augusta University.

When they looked at another group of 58 young black individuals also with low vitamin D and methylation levels who received varying doses of vitamin D supplements for 16 weeks, they found a dose response: the more vitamin D received, the higher the methylation activity, said Zhu, corresponding author of the study in the journal PLOS ONE.

"While much work remains, there appears to be a connection between healthy vitamin D levels and levels of DNA methylation," Zhu said. "We want to understand underlying mechanisms for how vitamin D insufficiency causes cancer, cardiovascular disease and immune system problems."

full story . . .
Vitamin D deficiency observed in children with type 1 diabetes
Apr 22, 2016

An American trial finds a high percentage of vitamin D deficiency in a large population of children with type 1 diabetes.

Researchers at the University of Pennsylvania School of Nursing looked to examine the association of 25-hydroxyvitamin D and blood glucose levels among children and adolescents with type 1 diabetes.

They recruited 197 children and adolescents and collected non-fasting blood samples to measure 25-hydroxyvitamin D and blood glucose levels. 23 per cent of the children were overweight; 13 per cent were obese.

The Department of Health defines low vitamin D status as a plasma concentration of 25-hydroxyvitamin D below 25 nmol/l. The study results did not list a category as low as this but did find that 41 per cent of the participants had levels below 50 nmol/L.
 

full story . . .
The benefits of Vitamin D
Apr 21, 2016

Vitamin D helps the body absorb calcium efficiently so that it can grow and maintain strong bones and teeth. Too little vitamin D can lead to decreased levels of calcium and phosphorus, which can cause rickets in children. Too much can cause an overload of calcium to be deposited into the body, resulting in calcification of the kidneys and other soft tissues over time.

Our bodies are meant to get most of the vitamin D we need from the sun. But caution around too much sun exposure, urban living and having darker skin can contribute to vitamin D deficiency in many people.

full story . . .
Could staying out of the sun actually increase your cancer risk?
Apr 21, 2016

New research has found that women with high concentrations of vitamin D have a much lower chance of developing cancer. But even more striking is this: avoiding the sun may be as dangerous as smoking.

Nonsmokers who stayed out of the sun had a life expectancy similar to smokers who soaked up the most rays, according to a recent study involving nearly 30,000 Swedish women over 20 years.

Avoiding the sun “is a risk factor for death of a similar magnitude as smoking” the authors wrote in a recent issue of the Journal of Internal Medicine. Compared with those with the highest sun exposure, life expectancy for those who avoided sun dropped by 0.6 to 2.1 years.

Meanwhile, a study published recently in the journal PLOS ONE found a 67 per cent reduction in risk for all cancers in women with higher vitamin D levels.

full story . . .
Are You Getting the Amount of Vitamin D Your Heart Needs?
Apr 20, 2016

Vitamin D is proving to be the boost that most people need to help them improve their heart function, but many Americans may not be getting enough of it, a top doctor says.
  
"Studies are showing what we’ve been finding all along – that vitamin D can lead to a dramatic improvement in heart function," Dr. Chauncey Crandall tells Newsmax Health

“Not only that, but vitamin D also has a host of other benefits. Studies also show that people who are deficient in vitamin D are also at greater risk for high blood pressure and diabetes, and there’s also evidence that this vitamin helps improve mood.”

In a recent study, researchers in the UK found that a daily dose of vitamin D helped strengthen the heart function of people with chronic heart failure, which is a major cause of death in the U.S.
 

full story . . .
 
Events  
19th Vitamin D Workshop March 29-31, 2016
Mar 29, 2016        8:00 am

19th Vitamin D Workshop

Boston, MA
 

March 29-31, 2016

​REVERE HOTEL BOSTON COMMON

event details
Blog  
Putting the Risk of Vitamin D Toxicity into Perspective
Mar 31, 2016

by Samantha Kimball, PhD, MLT

Vitamin D is unique among nutrients. Vitamin D is actually more of a hormone than a vitamin. Vitamin D is used by nearly every cell in the body. It can be obtained naturally from the sun or by ingesting it. It was named a “vitamin” when it was discovered that many people were deficient and it could be obtained from their diet, this happened because they were not getting enough from sun exposure. This is more prevalent today than ever.

If you are lucky enough to live near the equator, where you can synthesize vitamin D year-round, and you spend a minimal amount of time unprotected in the sun and fully exposed (15 minutes in a bathing suit) each day, you probably get enough vitamin D from that ball of life in the sky. However, we Canadians are not so lucky. Our northern climate means that in the winter the sun isn’t powerful enough for our bodies to make vitamin D at all and in the summer months, when it is possible to make vitamin D, most people wear sunscreen which blocks the sun and the production of vitamin D. With our extremely limited ability to obtain vitamin D naturally we need to supplement.

There is a continuous debate among vitamin D experts about how much vitamin D you need to take to be healthy. Opinions and comments like “Vitamin D has health benefits,” but “you shouldn’t take too much because it is just too risky!” are confusing and often portrayed in parallel in the media. What is missing is a little perspective.

full post . . .
How much vitamin D should I take?
Jan 14, 2016

This is the most common question for vitamin D. Recommending, calculating or finding the right dose of vitamin D intake for anyone is difficult. That’s because it’s complicated!

Why? Because everyone is different. Different weights, genetics, skin colour, diets, UV exposure etc. What research has shown us is that the same D3 supplementation dose given to a group of people will result in a wide range of vitamin D blood levels as determined through 25(OH)D testing.

Here is a chart published by GrassrootsHealth which shows vitamin D levels by D3 supplementation dose taken. You can see that the same dose provides a huge variation in vitamin D blood levels. How can anyone really predict where you will fall in this chart?

Recently a new Canadian research paper1 was published in the peer reviewed journal Nutrients, by a group of researchers from the University of Alberta (Veuglers 2015). They used a dual approach and a review of 108 published estimates of vitamin D supplementation to determine the optimal vitamin D dose that minimizes the risk for both a low and high vitamin D blood level.

full post . . .
The vitamin D debate is not likely to disappear
Dec 04, 2015

by Samantha Kimball, PhD, MLT

 There seems to be a line drawn in the sand with respect to the debate concerning what the optimal levels of vitamin D are for health, and neither side wants to budge. On one side of the line of the current debate are those who support the recommendations officially set by government agencies.  However, most of the researchers who actively study vitamin D consider the latest official advice to be inadequate.  

There has been contention about the vitamin D recommendations made by the Institute of Medicine (IOM, which advises both Health Canada and the United States Food and Drug Administration).  The IOM released its updated report for vitamin D and calcium in 2010. Yet several groups of vitamin D experts suggest that people should achieve ‘optimal’ levels of vitamin D status, levels that are considerably higher than the ones the IOM recommendations are based on. The IOM’s Recommended Daily Allowance (RDA) of 600 IU/d was calculated to achieve adequate vitamin D status which was determined to be serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels [25(OH)D] of 50 nmol/L in 97.5% of the population. On the other hand, the Endocrine Society, Osteoporosis Canada, American Geriatrics society and the European Vitamin D Association all recommend target 25(OH)D levels of at least 75 nmol/L. The Vitamin D Society, Grassroots Health and the Vitamin D Council recommend that 25(OH)D levels be maintained above 100 nmol/L which require intakes well above the RDA and even above the tolerable upper level of intake (UL) in overweight and obese individuals. Why would the subject matter experts disagree with the IOM so openly?

full post . . .
Books  

Susan Rex Ryan
Defend Your Life

Defend Your Life has three main sections. The first addresses the fundamentals of vitamin D3 and its awesome benefits as well as minimal risk. The second highlights select diseases and conditions about which vitamin D3 may offer protection. The third includes the author's personal vitamin D3 story, including her theory about adequate vitamin D3 levels and how you can 'Defend Your Life'.

Reading this book will help you understand how adequate amounts of vitamin D3 are essential to enhancing your quality of life.


Ian Wishart
Vitamin D: Is This the Miracle Vitamin?

In this compelling new book,award-winning investigative journalist and bestselling author Ian Wishart brings together the most up to date science on vitamin D and how it could well save your life. Cancer? Up to a 77% reduction in risk of developing it if you take this vitamin. Heart disease? The same kind of reduction. Did you know that autism, mental illness and multiple sclerosis all appear to be caused by a lack of vitamin D during pregnancy?

The lives of every single person, including you, will be affected by the information in this book. With more than 300 scientific trials and studies cited, this book is a reference guide not just for the general reader but for medical professionals alike.


John J. Cannell, MD
Athlete's Edge - Faster, Quicker, Stronger with vitamin D

John Cannell, founder and executive director of the Vitamin D Council, provides a new perspective on the vitamin D story revealing a long-held secret once known only to Eastern European athletic trainers.

Vitamin D, the sunshine vitamin, improves muscle tone, muscle strength, balance, reaction time and physical endurance, as well as immunity and general health. In addition, ideal levels of vitamin D help protect you from a staggering array of chronic diseases such as cancer, heart disease, hypertension, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, asthma, autism and even influenza.


 more books...

PRESS RELEASES
 
SCIENTIFIC ADVISORS

Sun is good for you you may live longer, study finds

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

Vitamin D Society urges re-examination of sun safety guidelines

TORONTO, Ont. (April 27, 2016) – Swedish women who avoid sunshine shorten their lifespans by the same amount as smoking.  This latest research was just published in the Journal of Internal Medicine. Like the Swedes, Canadians need to balance the benefits of sun exposure with the risks. It is not healthy to avoid sunshine, which provides the ultraviolet light that makes vitamin D, says the Vitamin D Society.

Between 1990 and 1992, 30,000 Swedish women were surveyed about risk factors for malignant melanoma the worst form of skin cancer.  For the next 20 years, the women’s death records were followed.  Those women with active sun exposure habits were at a lower risk of death from cardiovascular disease and causes of death other than cancer or heart disease, causes such as diabetes, multiple sclerosis and pulmonary disease.

Compared to those with the highest sun exposure, life expectancy for women who avoided sun was shorter by .6 to 2.1 years.

The lead author of the report, Dr. Pelle Lindqvist, put it another way: “We found smokers in the highest sun exposure group were at a similar risk as non-smokers avoiding sun exposure, indicating avoidance of sun exposure to be a risk factor of the same magnitude as smoking.” He went on to conclude that, “Guidelines being too restrictive regarding sun exposure may do more harm than good for health.”

full press release

New study shows higher levels of vitamin D can drastically lower risk of cancer by 67%

TORONTO, Ont. (April 11, 2016) – Women with high concentrations of vitamin D have been found to have a much lower chance of developing cancer, according to a recently published study.

Published in the journal PLOS ONE and authored by a team from Creighton University, University of California, San Diego and GrassrootsHealth, the research found a 67% reduction in risk for all cancers in women with vitamin D levels > 100 nmol/L (40 ng/ml) compared to women with vitamin D levels < 50 nmol/L (20 ng/ml). 

Drawing on results from one of Creighton’s past studies, Dr. Heaney and researchers at the University of California, San Diego School of Medicine worked with Dr. Lappe’s team and GrassrootsHealth to provide data from its members to aid in the study. Combining both pools of data, the researchers were able to create a larger overall cohort of 2,304 women with a broader range of serum levels for the analysis.

The resulting conclusion was that women with higher than 100 nmol/L (40 ng/ml) vitamin D levels were associated with substantial reduction in risk of all invasive cancers combined.

full press release

Battling the winter blues and seasonal affective disorder with vitamin D

TORONTO, Ont (December 14, 2015) – Canada’s long, dark winter brings with it the blahs and symptoms of seasonal affective disorder (SAD) for many, however a Canadian doctor is looking to the sunshine vitamin to aid those suffering.

Seasonal depression and SAD is a mental condition that develops in some individuals who do not receive enough natural light.  Shorter winter days makes Canadians more at risk of the disorder, which can lead to symptoms of decreased energy to difficulty concentrating to feelings of anxiety and despair, among others.

According to Dr. Samantha Kimball, Scientific Advisor for the Vitamin D Society, vitamin D levels change when the seasons do and low times of vitamin D match periods of depression in SAD patients. In her research she has found that increasing vitamin D intake can help reduce the symptoms of patients suffering from SAD.

full press release
 
Dr. Reinhold Vieth

Professor, University of Toronto, Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology.


Click to View Carole Baggerly

"Director, GrassrootsHealth, a Public Health Promotion Organization
leading D*action, the world's largest ongoing vitamin D intervention
project.
www.grassrootshealth.net"

 


Click to View Dr. John Cannell M.D.

Executive Director‚ The Vitamin D Council
San Luis Obispo, CA, USA

www.vitamindcouncil.com


 more advisors...

Converter Tool

In Canada Vitamin D 25(OH)D levels are measured in nmol/L. In the U.S. it is measured as ng/ml. To convert:

Enter nmol/L: ng/ml
Enter ng/ml: nmol/L