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LATEST VITAMIN D NEWS
 
UPCOMING EVENTS, BLOG AND NEW BOOKS
Study Finds Tanning Salon Sunbeds Effective for Raising Vitamin D Levels
Nov 16, 2017

Sunbeds with a UVB component similar to solar summer sunshine may provide an effective alternate vitamin D source during winter months, according to a new Canadian study just published in the journal Dermato Endocrinology. 

 
People who use tanning salons, specifically sunbeds that have UVB during the winter reach physiological blood levels (>100 nmol/L) of vitamin D, the study reported. It found 
that participants who used typical sunbeds emitting UVB rays in the range equivalent to outdoor summer sunshine increased their vitamin D blood levels on average by 42 nmol/L. This was achieved using standard tanning exposure schedules on salon sunbeds.
 
“Sunbeds enable exposure to nearly 100% of skin in a controlled manner which amplifies their effectiveness for vitamin D production,” said Dr. Samantha Kimball, lead author and research director at Pure North S’Energy Foundation in Calgary, AB. “We found that you can effectively raise your vitamin D levels into the desired range without burning and following Health Canada’s recommendations. But there are risks to any type of UV exposure, whether from the sun or sunbed.”
full story . . .
Research into link between vitamin D and schizophrenia wins medal
Nov 15, 2017

Research into brain development and schizophrenia has led to international acclaim for The University of Queensland’s Professor John McGrath, recipient of Denmark’s Strömgren Medal.

Queensland Brain Institute researcher and Director of the Queensland Centre for Mental Health Research’s Professor McGrath studies the epidemiology of schizophrenia – searching for the causes, effects and patterns of the illness.

Professor McGrath and his team demonstrated low vitamin D status in pregnant women and babies could affect brain development and increase risk of schizophrenia later in life.

Professor McGrath’s 2016 appointment to the Niels Bohr Professorship Program in Aarhus, Denmark established an international program of psychiatric epidemiology, which included a project to investigate the link between schizophrenia and vitamin D levels in 80,000 newborns.

Professor McGrath will deliver the medal’s accompanying Erik Strömgren Lecture. 

“It will be an opportunity to reflect on many years of vitamin D research, done in close collaboration with my colleagues in Denmark,” said Professor McGrath.

full story . . .
Vitamin D may be simple treatment to enhance burn healing
Nov 06, 2017

Patients with severe burns who have higher levels of vitamin D recover more successfully than those with lower levels, according to a study presented at the Society for Endocrinology annual conference in Harrogate. This study is the first to investigate the role of vitamin D in recovery from burn injury and suggests that vitamin D supplementation may be a simple and cost-effective treatment to enhance burn healing.

Despite improvements in burn care over the last 10 years, many patients are still at risk of poor recovery. Complications can range from delayed wound healing through to infections. Patients with severe burns are at high risk of infection that may lead to life-threatening sepsis. Vitamin D is known to have antibacterial actions that may help combat infection and therefore aid in wound healing of burn patients.

In order to investigate the role of vitamin D in recovery from burn injuries, Professor Janet Lord and Dr Khaled Al-Tarrah, at the Institute of Inflammation & Aging in Birmingham, assessed the recovery progress, over one year, in patients with severe burns and correlated this with their vitamin D levels. The study found that patients with higher levels of vitamin D had a better prognosis, with improved wound healing, fewer complications and less scarring. The data also showed that burns patients tend to have lower levels of vitamin D. These data suggest that vitamin D supplementation immediately following burn injury may have potent health benefits to the patient, including enhanced antimicrobial activity to prevent infection, and improved wound healing.

full story . . .
Research suggests children in northern latitudes more likely to be vitamin D deficient in winter​
Oct 27, 2017

New U.S. research on vitamin D supplementation in children suggests that those living in northern latitudes are at a higher risk of vitamin D deficiency.

Carried out by researchers from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts in Massachusetts and colleagues, the new study set out to assess whether the current recommended daily allowance (RDA) of vitamin D was enough to raise blood levels to nutrient sufficiency in children in northern latitudes, especially during the winter months.

As living in northern latitudes means shorter days and less sunlight during the winter, it can also mean far less vitamin D, known as the "sunshine" vitamin.

full story . . .
Doctor’s Orders: Don’t Become Vitamin D Deficient This Winter
Oct 25, 2017

Vitamin D, nicknamed the “sunshine vitamin,” is essential to maintaining our health and immune system. As you might have guessed, the main source of this vital little vitamin comes from the sun. But as our weather transitions from warm to cold, so too must we adjust our sources of vitamin D, since catching some rays in the middle of the day can become impossible depending on where you live.

That vitamin D has a natural non-food source makes it unique among vitamins—sunlight actually allows it to be synthesized, or made, within our bodies. If you live in a cold climate, it’s normal for your vitamin D stores to dip in fall or winter—you’re simply not getting enough ultraviolet B (UVB) rays, which trigger the skin to produce vitamin D.

full story . . .
The Vitamin D Gap
Oct 24, 2017

Living in northern latitudes such as New England means not only shorter days and less sunlight during the winter, but also far less vitamin D, the “sunshine” vitamin. And adequate vitamin D intake, which is crucial to bone health, can be difficult for children in particular to achieve through food alone.

In a new study, researchers from the Friedman School of Nutrition Science and Policy at Tufts and colleagues conducted a clinical trial administering three supplemental doses of vitamin D in Boston area schoolchildren who were vitamin D deficient or at risk for deficiency. They found that bringing the majority of participants safely to sufficiency took a dose that was more than three times the recommended daily allowance for vitamin D for children.

The study, published online last month in the Journal of Clinical Endocrinology & Metabolism and led by Jennifer Sacheck, associate professor of nutrition at the Friedman School, sought to determine whether the current recommended daily allowance (RDA) was enough to raise blood levels to nutrient sufficiency in children in northern latitudes, especially across the winter months when blood levels tend to fall. The randomized double-blind clinical trial investigated the effect of three supplemental doses of vitamin D3— the current RDA of 600, as well as 1000 or 2000 IU per day—administered over six months in more than 600 schoolchildren ages 8 to 15 in the greater Boston area.

full story . . .
 
Events  
Vitamin D Day
Nov 02, 2017        9:00 am

Vitamin D Day

November 2, 2017

Please share and join our Thunderclap to support:

https://www.thunderclap.it/projects/63376-vitamin-d-day?platform=hootsuite

For more information go to:

http://www.vitamindday.net/

event details
21st Vitamin D Workshop
May 16, 2018        

21st Vitamin D Workshop

2018
 

Barcelona, Spain - May 16-19, 2018

event details
Blog  
Canadian Winter – How can I get enough vitamin D?
Nov 10, 2017

By Perry Holman, Executive Director, Vitamin D Society

Canadians’ vitamin D levels drop substantially in winter due to the lack of UVB in the sun at our northern latitude at this time of year. For November Vitamin D Awareness month, the Vitamin D Society has released a new short video to help people develop a vitamin D winter action plan.

First, let’s understand why a great number of Canadians are vitamin D deficient. Until about 100 years ago, people spent a large amount of their time outdoors. Now most of us work indoors and increasingly spend our leisure time inside, drawn to the Internet, TV, video games and other passive forms of recreation. When we are outdoors, many of us follow health warnings to protect ourselves from UV exposure with sunscreen, clothing and shade.

The result is that Canadians’ vitamin D levels have fallen by 13% in just six years. Approximately 14 million Canadians — 38% of the population — do not meet Health Canada guidelines for vitamin D levels of 50 nmol/L. This puts them at a higher risk for serious diseases such as osteoporosis, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, cancer and cardiovascular disease.

But it gets worse. The vitamin D level recommended by Health Canada is only half the level recommended by a large number of vitamin D experts. Forty eight scientists, doctors and researchers have recommended that everyone reach a 25(OH)D blood level of between 100-150 nmol/L. And nearly all of us, 93% of us in fact, are below these optimal vitamin D levels.

 

full post . . .
If you are not taking vitamin D daily - then it may not be working
Aug 03, 2017

by Carole Baggerly, Director at GrassrootsHealth

Today I have decided to get all the exercise I will need this month. So, I am going to get up, head to the gym and do 15 different sessions of cardio interspersed with 15 different sessions of my weight machines. Then, I will take a yoga class to round out the day. 

Ridiculous - right? 

 

full post . . .
Are People Really Taking Sky-High Doses of Vitamin D?
Jul 11, 2017

By Perry Holman, Executive Director, Vitamin D Society

A new study1 recently reported trends in vitamin D supplementation in the USA from 1999 to 2014. It found that that vitamin D supplement use of ≥1000 IU or more per day increased from 0.3% in 1999 to 18.2% in 2014. Also vitamin D supplement use of ≥4000 IU per day increased from 0.2% in 2007 to 3.2% in 2014.

The researchers made this key point in their discussion:

“Overall, 3% of the population exceeded the tolerable upper limit of 4000 IU daily, and may be at risk of adverse effects as a consequence”

But how many people were really supplementing over 4000 IU/d? If they were just taking 4000 IU/d there would be no risk as this is the safe upper limit and does not require doctor supervision.

full post . . .
Books  

Susan Rex Ryan
Defend Your Life

Defend Your Life has three main sections. The first addresses the fundamentals of vitamin D3 and its awesome benefits as well as minimal risk. The second highlights select diseases and conditions about which vitamin D3 may offer protection. The third includes the author's personal vitamin D3 story, including her theory about adequate vitamin D3 levels and how you can 'Defend Your Life'.

Reading this book will help you understand how adequate amounts of vitamin D3 are essential to enhancing your quality of life.


Ian Wishart
Vitamin D: Is This the Miracle Vitamin?

In this compelling new book,award-winning investigative journalist and bestselling author Ian Wishart brings together the most up to date science on vitamin D and how it could well save your life. Cancer? Up to a 77% reduction in risk of developing it if you take this vitamin. Heart disease? The same kind of reduction. Did you know that autism, mental illness and multiple sclerosis all appear to be caused by a lack of vitamin D during pregnancy?

The lives of every single person, including you, will be affected by the information in this book. With more than 300 scientific trials and studies cited, this book is a reference guide not just for the general reader but for medical professionals alike.


 more books...

PRESS RELEASES
 
SCIENTIFIC ADVISORS

Canadian Study Finds Tanning Salon Sunbeds Effective for Raising Vitamin D Levels

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

TORONTO, Ont (November 15, 2017) – Sunbeds with a UVB component similar to solar summer sunshine may provide an effective alternate vitamin D source during winter months, according to a new Canadian study just published in the journal Dermato Endocrinology.

People who use tanning salons, specifically sunbeds that have UVB during the winter reach physiological blood levels (>100 nmol/L) of vitamin D, the study reported. It found that participants who used typical sunbeds emitting UVB rays in the range equivalent to outdoor summer sunshine increased their vitamin D blood levels on average by 42 nmol/L. This was achieved using standard tanning exposure schedules on salon sunbeds.

“Sunbeds enable exposure to nearly 100% of skin in a controlled manner which amplifies their effectiveness for vitamin D production,” said Dr. Samantha Kimball, lead author and research director at Pure North S’Energy Foundation in Calgary, AB. “We found that you can effectively raise your vitamin D levels into the desired range without burning and following Health Canada’s recommendations. But there are risks to any type of UV exposure, whether from the sun or sunbed.”

full press release

How can I get enough vitamin D during a Canadian winter?

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

TORONTO, Ont (November 8, 2017) – Canadians’ vitamin D levels drop substantially in winter due to the lack of UVB in the sun at our northern latitude at this time of year. For November Vitamin D Awareness month, the Vitamin D Society has released a new short video to help people develop a vitamin D winter action plan.

First, let’s understand why a great number of Canadians are vitamin D deficient. Until about 100 years ago, people spent a large amount of their time outdoors. Now most of us work indoors and increasingly spend our leisure time inside, drawn to the Internet, TV, video games and other passive forms of recreation. When we are outdoors, many of us follow health warnings to protect ourselves from UV exposure with sunscreen, clothing and shade.

The result is that Canadians’ vitamin D levels have fallen by 13% in just six years. Approximately 14 million Canadians — 38% of the population — do not meet Health Canada guidelines for vitamin D levels of 50 nmol/L. This puts them at a higher risk for serious diseases such as osteoporosis, diabetes, multiple sclerosis, cancer and cardiovascular disease.

full press release

Vitamin D Day calls attention to World Health Crisis

NEWS RELEASE
For Immediate Distribution

TORONTO, Ont (October 26, 2017) – Canadians’ vitamin D levels continue to plummet, according to the latest report from Statistics Canada. Vitamin D levels for Canadians, aged six to 79, have dropped by 13% in the last six years and show no signs of improvement. Fourteen million Canadians do not meet Health Canada’s vitamin D blood level requirements of 50 nmol/L. This figure rises to 15 million —40 per cent of us — during winter months.

The Vitamin D Society has proclaimed November as Vitamin D Awareness month since 2009 and is working with the Vitamin D Council from the US to celebrate Vitamin D Day on November 2nd. Vitamin D Day is a day for Canadians to learn about the importance of vitamin D for good health and to take action to ensure that they have optimal vitamin D blood levels.

Dr. Gerry Schwalfenberg, an Assistant Clinical Professor at the University of Alberta who also has a clinical patient practice, has published numerous papers calling attention to this disturbing vitamin D deficiency problem.

“I see patients’ vitamin D levels start to drop at this time of the year when sunlight does not contain sufficient UVB to make vitamin D in your skin,” he says. “Without immediate corrective action through supplementation or artificial UVB exposure, these people will be vitamin D deficient until next summer or longer if they avoid the sun. This leads to a higher risk of many diseases such as cancer, heart disease, osteoporosis, diabetes, multiple sclerosis and also infections such as colds and flu.”

full press release
 
Click to View Dr. Reinhold Vieth

Professor, University of Toronto, Departments of Nutritional Sciences and Laboratory Medicine and Pathobiology.


Click to View Dr. Michael Holick, Ph.D., M.D.

Professor of Medicine, Physiology and Biophysics; Director of the General Clinical Research Unit; and Director of the Bone Health Care Clinic and the Director of the Heliotherapy, Light, and Skin Research Center at Boston University Medical Center.


Click to View Dr. Cedric Garland, DrPH

Professor Emeritus in the Department of Family Medicine and Public Health at the University of California, San Diego.


 more advisors...

Converter Tool

In Canada Vitamin D 25(OH)D levels are measured in nmol/L. In the U.S. it is measured as ng/ml. To convert:

Enter nmol/L: ng/ml
Enter ng/ml: nmol/L